Change is Popular

The topic of change doesn’t go away.  Google the phrase books on ‘change‘ and 1,570,000,000 results come up.  Change methods results in 928,000,000 searches;  change management 474,000,000;  change leadership 493,000,000; strength-based change 51,200,000; strength-based leadership  4,150,000.  You get my point.

There are countless ways to approach change. Your values, mindset and experience will determine what fits for you.  We talk about winners and losers in change.  There is money to be made in change, especially if you are brought in to design or facilitate it.

Responding to Change

With regard to organizational change, where you sit in an organization is likely to determine how you might view it.  You could adopt any of the following perspectives and actions. You could:

  • Deal with it
  • Force it
  • Mandate it
  • Institutionalize it
  • Defend it
  • Implore it
  • Ignore it
  • Create it artificially – from a place of fear, threats, organizational weaknesses, fire and brim stone and forcing compliance
  • Invite it
  • Embrace it
  • Request it
  • Play with it
  • Recommend it
  • Create it transparently – from a place of possibility, opportunities, strengths, aspirations and foster commitment

Strength-based Approach to Change

When you take the perspective that every system – human or otherwise – has something that works already – it opens up the opportunity and the possibility to begin to address change from those perspectives.

Invite more of what works already so we can do more of THAT!

You know what?  People respond to that.  When a community discovers together what it does well already and openly celebrates, and acknowledges assets, successes, and its collective capabilities, it creates upwards spirals of energy and interest that fuel a spirit of WE can do this, Vs. IT can’t be done.

The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated ~ William James

There are a number of ways to invite people to be active participants in their own change. Appreciative Inquiry, Open Space Technology, World Cafe, Search Conferencing are such examples.  Creating a safe space for people to share the best of their past and co-create their dreams and pathways for a bright future speaks to creating change from a transparent place.  It requires trusting open, collaborative, generative and generous perspectives and practices.

20 Positive Outcomes

When you invite people to discover the high points of a past change experience where they focus on what works Vs do a post mortem on the weakness and failures, this is what can be unleashed:

1 stories of best performance

2 celebration of past successes

3 growing positive metrics

4 sharing most favorable feedback

5 energized activities

6 engaged communication

7 willingness to jump in

8 go that extra mile

9 volunteer mindset

10 abundance of ideas

11 increased support for each other

12 greater sharing of ideas

13 openness to customer feedback

14 greater collaboration around initiatives

15 more communication across the organization

16 increased transparency

17 greater acceptance of risk

18 sharing resources

19 leadership shows up where least expected

20 joy and play become part of work

The list is a just a start.  What else have you discovered?  Let’s build the evidence for strength-based change to develop our communities and places of work.

Post first appeared at: positivitystrategist.com

About Robyn Stratton Berkessel

Robyn Stratton-Berkessel is the “Positivity Strategist”. Robyn is an author, speaker, podcast host, app developer, designer, facilitator, and coach. She partners with executives and teams around the world co-creating cultures of ownership, empowerment, inclusion and collaboration. Her background includes “Big 4” management consulting, financial and professional services, telecommunications, pharmaceuticals, retail, education and not-for-profit.


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